cognitive consistency
definition: This theory focuses on the balance individuals create cognitively when inconsistencies create tensions and thus motivate our brains and body to respond. This theory is very similar to the dissonance theory of Leon Festinger, which emphasizes the importance of positive and negative outcomes to reduce stressful choices. Although the cognitive consistency theory touches on this issue, it focuses on the affects of inconsistencies motivating people to react. Basically, we need our thoughts and our actions to be the same.

summary of research: Festinger's research was mostly done on cognitive dissonance, but a major principle was cognitive consistency. The research was done about people needing the consistency, and that they will motivate themselves to create the missing consistency. Festinger had three steps to the theory; people expect consistency, inconsistencies create a state of dissonance, and dissonance drives us to restore consistency. Most of the research found that people expect consistency in their lives, and that it is natural for people to expect it to work out like that. Cognitive consistency stops when there is conflict or tension, then it becomes cognitive dissonance.

links:
http://astro.temple.edu/~yperez/Consistency.htm

pop culture:
-Cognitive consistency is in a old story called "The Fox and the Grapes" by Aesop.
http://www.aesops-fables.org.uk/aesop-fable-the-fox-and-the-grapes.htm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6r5kMQkM38&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PL7DF6A8059295AC0C
- these videos show cognitive consistency because the actions of the mothers are that they stopped using downy as a detergent and then when the people in the commercial realize the mothers panic and that shows that their thoughts and actions are not the same, eventually leading to dissonance.

This image shows that the action of working is what they love to do and when they get to think about it causing tension and conflict, but once it is resolved the actions and mind are consistent.
This image shows that the action of working is what they love to do and when they get to think about it causing tension and conflict, but once it is resolved the actions and mind are consistent.

-This image shows that when someones thoughts do not match their actions it leads to conflict, but once they get back to the way they were their thoughts then match their actions again.


connection to NHS:
an example of cognitive consistency, occurs in the purchasing decisions we make on a regular basis. Most people want to hold the belief that they make good choices. When a product or item we purchase turns out badly, it conflicts with our previously existing belief about our decision-making abilities.
- teenagers are always spending money freely and are not always think about the future when buying things, and at the time you think it is good but then you can feel badly when something goes wrong.

Bibliography:

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1517&bih=741&tbm=isch&tbnid=LGQNlc52oMdOQM:&imgrefurl=http://istheory.byu.edu/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance_theory&docid=87z-Urg-sDEE4M&imgurl=http://istheory.byu.edu/w/images/5/5c/Cdt2.JPG&w=636&h=288&ei=iMp0T7CMB9GM0QGQ4rH_Ag&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=664&sig=109398460201990128048&page=1&tbnh=67&tbnw=150&start=0&ndsp=35&ved=1t:429,r:5,s:0&tx=92&ty=3

http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/f/dissonance.htm

http://astro.temple.edu/~yperez/Consistency.htm