DE-INDIVIDUATION: “collective mind”: primitive in nature causing uninhibited behavior


Misconception: People that riot in large crowds are scum who are looking for an excuse to steal and become violent.
The Truth: People lose their individuality and become absorbed into the group unconscious.


The psychological state of being aroused when individuals join crowds or large groups resulting in...
  • decreased self-evaluation
  • anti-normative actions
  • disinhibited behavior
  • no awareness of individuality
  • a sense of diffused responsibility
  • no concern for others or how they may evaluate one’s behavior

It is important to remember that FACTORS CONTRIBUTE TO DE-INDIVIDUATION...like...
  • Becoming a part of a large group-(riot,mob,army)
  • Becoming apart of a fulfilling activity or hobby
  • Anonymity- (can not be found out)
  • Diffused responsibility- (not responsible for my actions)

DE-INDIVIDUATION ALLOWS...
-reduced individual self-restraint and normative regulation of behavior

THIS THEORY IS IMPORTANT BECAUSE....
it provides an explantion of why people act in violent crowds, mindless actions, lynch mobs, etc...

THINK OF...
-sporting events, what happens when the home team loses it all?

CLICK THE LINK....are you a Lakers fan?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8Q6xi79UP8&feature=related\

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPTUbirMNL4


SCARY THOUGHT....
De-individuation has been related and connected to other social phenomena's such as genocides, stereotyping, and other things such as other human communication.




external image L8xbVmxYsfFD-aUVHefrKyVTr3nOYj9KmMaF0ZGwMy0QTiyenKsNhlBNNLn7ew9YqQ69XejjO82KiBGuD6KmQZFoGwXyfnoHL2eT16jw29T-fw_fgwA







Individuals cannot be criticized when in a crowd because they are absorbed, no one knows whether or not if an individual actually participated. A large group decreases a person’s accountability and responsibility. This decreases their sense of responsibility.




external image YRIiPukoZ0jcA4V7ypA2UrSGaXZ69z5POI0L-WETwSbwjORlnqj6I0BVstMUoqcVO17IU-aX4dyAsraWxq78Dhu_D5gToRMzH3lw4BvAOVTH8Nq1lPw

A common example of deindividuation is rioting. In a riot, individuals lose their self identity. In a riot, people usually become reckless and do rebellious actions such as being violent and viscous toward other people. People often get beat up and property gets damaged. In a riot, it is very hard to pick out exactly who did what and who gets blamed or arrested.



external image i8yrtKEf1eif5fJbQ-YlZNOiK052wXO-1aussOg8fkrOvJ-oqZLbHgHEtqoiN9UEXLfpaMK-FAEpIkRxLFazG4GfxIeAnEBrDoWiltzTQubxoRg_wRg

Deindividuation is found in media. Above is a photo from the movie "Mean Girls". This is an example of deindividuation when one person will change behaviors when exposed to a new group. In this movie, it explores how a innocent girl changed into a manipulative women after joining the popular crowd at school.












external image 4CSVWi3ICPsUUbhlEFze8BV2-MheouY6puJfPTjx_L1lFySarCUdSbFo2T8vVb0sGWjSw8K4YuVA8-F-IHp4o9Dms6QbFlySVydqKv_087AYZ1jdsBo


“No doubt such ideas are always created by solitary minds, but is it not the genius of crowds that has furnished the thousands of grains of dust forming the soil in which they have sprung up? Crowds, doubtless, are always unconscious”-Le Bon

Above is the cover of a book written by Gustave Le Bon. In his book, Bon is able to explain and explore the unconscious minds of individuals when they are submerged in a group. Their thoughts are conjoined into one mass emotion. This book is a great read and is recommended for anyone that is interested in learning more about the behavior of an individual changes a person under goes in a crowd. Bon was a psychologist and sociologist and was able to explore the psychology of crowds which can be connected to today society.



DEINDIVIDUATION



http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/deindividuation.htm
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/tag/deindividuation/
http://youarenotsosmart.com/2011/02/10/deindividuation/

http://www.units.muohio.edu/psybersite/fans/deindividuation.shtml


http://people.exeter.ac.uk/tpostmes/deindividuation.html